The Farewell (2019): Comedy / Drama

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Using a wedding as an excuse, a Chinese family gathers after many years to bid farewell to their grandmother who doesn’t know she is dying.

“Based on an actual lie”… Lulu Wang’s real-life same case scenario inspires her to write and direct a bittersweet film about death, the way it brings people together, and the human awkwardness surrounding it. Powerful is also the subplot showcasing the moral differences between East and West even when language is not a barrier. The film consists of amazing, everyday, relatable characters, beautiful music (Wang’s behind the piano) that doesn’t dictate how one should feel, meticulous editing that balances the aspects of comedy and drama, and Lulu’s daring lens that unfolds a funny, yet heartbreaking story.

I proudly take my hat off to all cast and crew as well as the financers that I can only imagine the risks they took behind such investment. A great addition to the modern cinema that will make you laugh and cry while reconsidering whatwhen, and how you would like to say to the people you love the most.

P.S. SPOILER ALERT: After watching it, I urge you to find out what happened in the end in Wang’s real-life story https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8637428/trivia?item=tr4647494

 

Shiying… this is for you! Thank you wholeheartedly for your wonderful recommendation!!!

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Trick ‘r Treat (2007): Comedy / Horror

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Demons, witches, pranks going wrong, werewolves, serial killers and a virgin, all happen in a small town’s Halloween night.

Jack O’ Lantern’s favourite comedy/horror. Writer/Director Michael Dougherty offers great home entertainment by blending scared kids, horny teenagers, and mentally deranged adults in a non-linear narrative horror with plenty of laughs, quirky performances, snappy editing, and highly creative costumes. Winner of the 2009 Fright Meter Award for Best Horror, Trick ‘r Treat is surrounded by mystery itself as, without explanation, it was pulled from the schedule, did not get a theatrical release, and went straight to DVD two years later. Producer Brian Singer reunites the amazing Brian Cox and the mesmerising Anna Paquin after X-Men 2 (2003). So, turn the lights off, grab something unhealthy to munch, and forget about all of your problems for the next hour and twenty minutes. Happy Halloween!

Parasite (2019): Comedy / Drama / Thriller

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Father, mother, daughter, and son – all unemployed – con a wealthy family into giving them jobs and manage to get access to their house… that is more than meets the eye.

Joon-ho Bong… the writer/director that brought you Memories of Murder (2003), The Host (2006), Tokyo! (2008), Snowpiercer (2013), and Okja (2017), to name but a few, strikes back with a comedy, drama, thriller that makes you laugh, cry, and hold your breath, and not necessarily in that order. Avoid spoilers at all costs. Parasite deserves to be watched with an “uninfected” mind. Then, and only then jump to conclusions about its metaphors, Bong’s thematic similarities with previous films, the clash of classes, and how similar concepts have been filmed in ways that yield entirely different results. Bring to your mind a new or an old film, one that had an impact on you or simply became popular. I still can’t stop comparing it and contrasting it to the same year’s Us (2019). Enough said…

Parasite is the first-ever Korean film to win the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes and I can only imagine how Bong fell during the prolonged standing ovation it received. Hats off and congratulations to all cast and crew.

Rim of the World (2019): Action / Adventure / Comedy

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Four teenagers meet at a campsite when the world gets invaded by aliens and it is up them to save humanity.

Well, well… if I haven’t elaborated before on exploiting kids and races! Anyway, you know what, I’m not gonna go through it again. So, let’s focus on the film itself.

It’s Independence Day (1996) meets Jurrasic Park (1993), meets Stand By Me (1986), meets E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) (and quite a few more) but, unfortunately, it’s neither! Not even close. On the plus side, it’s fun. Made me chuckle a few times. Should you decide to watch it, don’t have any expectations. Put it on and forget your problems for just over an hour and a half.

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988): Adventure / Comedy / Fantasy

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In times of war and reason, Baron Munchausen shows up to inspire with a story of a lifetime that bypasses reality and goes down the rabbit hole of evocative fantasy and mythical adventure.

From Constantinople to the moon, to the centre of the Earth, to the belly of the beast, and back, Baron Munchausen travels towards fabled worlds encountering heroes and deities. Nostalgia, love, dreams, childhood innocence and hope rise up through Munchausen’s escapades. A social commentary inspired by the Odyssey… delineated in a British aristocratic manner.

As one of my first cinematic experiences, Terry Gilliam makes me reminisce about my childhood years and the way I used to see the world. Where, like in the film, reality and imagination blend into one and shape a harmless world where even the abhorrent tragedy of war can be a lot easier to swallow and man’s cruelty be tolerable.

John Neville, Eric Idle, Sarah Polley, Jonathan Pryce, Uma Thurman, Robin Williams (unpaid and uncredited) and the rest of the cast shared Gilliam’s vision of a better world than ours and supported him to see it through as the unfathomably humongous production complications wouldn’t stop appearing.

But reality’s misfortunes were defeated by prevalent, mythical will that projected it eventually to the silver screen.

Sorry to Bother You (2018): Comedy / Fantasy / Sci-Fi

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In a parallel universe, in Oakland, a telemarketer goes from having nothing to having everything to losing it all over again when in reality he had it all, lost it, and then tries to gain it again.

Is it perplexed? So is the film… Before I write any review, I make sure not to read other reviews or critiques so I know for a fact that I am stating my point of view and my point of view alone. “Sorry to Bother You” is “Comedy”, is “Fantasy”, but it is not “Sci-Fi”. It looks like a fresh take on Charlie Kaufman’s way of thinking, topped up with Boots Riley’s unique approach. Before watching it, the range of comments I had heard spanned from “genius” to “moronic” and from “amazing” to “horrendous”. So, chances are that you will either love it or loathe it. Here’s what I think…

Cassius Green represents the number of times you have asked yourself “Why does no one see how wrong the world is”? At first, he sees it. Then he becomes part of it. And then he wakes up, gets out, and does something about it. Lakeith Stanfield is brilliant as Cassius who lives in a surrealistically psychedelic world, like ours, just more artistically – Kaufman-esque – portrayed. Well, in our world, Donald Trump is the President of the United States of America, a laughable joke from “The Simpsons” (1989), so not that much more…

Steve Lift (Armie Hammer) represents the system that feeds off greed. And our ambition to do something more with our lives, and become something better, and change that system, can fool even ourselves and become that very same greed that feeds it.

“Sorry to Bother You” parodies our world not because it wants to undermine it. Boots Riley comprehends the “If you want to tell people the truth, you’d better make them laugh or they’ll kill you” (George Bernard Shaw) mentality, and through a respectful, meaningful, and didactic parable, makes you laugh but also “see” how much work needs to be done so our world can be a tad more understood.

Last but not least, Detroit, who is none other than the one and only, breathtaking, and always dazzling woman and actress Tessa Thompson represents love. In a subtle and artistic form, she has always been the one to prevent us from going astray and make us become the people that we always hoped we would be.

Scrooged (1988): Comedy / Drama / Fantasy

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A cold-hearted, spiteful TV executive, hell-bent on ruining everyone’s Christmas around him is paid a visit by three ghosts on Christmas Eve.

A modern adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”. Funny, emotional, didactic, “Scrooged” will make you laugh but also mist your eyes. You’ll love every second of it. Bill Murray goes over the top and exceeds everyone’s expectations. Karen Allen is a beauty and makes you smile every time she does. Alfre Woodard is amazing as always. Danny Elfman was, is, and always will be the master of Christmas scores. And last but not least, the incredibly versatile Richard Donner who orchestrates this brilliant film giving it the befitting, illustrious style it deserves. Shame that he and Murray didn’t work well together. A massive round of applause to all cast and crew for making this film a classic for us to enjoy to this very day and encourage us to… put a little love in our heart!

I take my hat off to Richard Donner and everyone in the production team where, in the most festive period of the year, in one of the most troubled years of South Africa, in their way, they offer their support against the atrocity of apartheid.

Filth (2013): Comedy / Crime / Drama

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A mentally unstable, crooked, alcoholic, drug addict cop stops at nothing to get the promotion he is so passionately after while fighting with his inner demons.

I’ll start this way… Until “The Last King of Scotland” (2006), James McAvoy was not my cup of tea. By far not! After “X-Men: First Class”, I started changing my mind. After “Filth” I knew I couldn’t have been more wrong. Or, actually, I had been wrong that much once more. With Leonardo DiCaprio after “Gangs of New York” (2002). But then all of us men were. So, I apologise to both.

James McAvoy in “Filth” gave the best performance of his life in 2013. And John S. Baird directed the best film of his career – Even though “Cass” (2008) was pretty amazing too. “Filth” will make you laugh and it will make you cry, and it will make you laugh and cry again and again until you don’t know how to feel anymore about anyone. Based on the novel by Irvine Welsh, “Filth” is one of the best Scottish films since “Trainspotting” (1996), yet another novel by Irvine Welsh. Changing genre every five minutes, “Filth” is a dramatically funny, surrealistically twisted cinematic journey through the paranoia of a corrupted, deranged, bipolar cop that will drive you bonkers. It’s worth mentioning that Jim Broadbent, in the hallucinatory world, is scarily hilarious.

McAvoy’s psychedelic performance here will prepare you for his cringing performance in “Split” (2016) and the upcoming “Glass” (2019). See how it all started…

Fun fact: “Trainspotting” and “Filth”, potentially, coexist in the same universe.

Game Night (2018): Action / Comedy / Crime

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A game night between a group of friends goes awry when one of the participants gets kidnapped by gangsters.

It is exactly what you expect from a Jason Bateman comedy: Foul language, surreal characters, brilliant chemistry between the actors, non-realistic, yet comedic and graphic twists and turns, and shameless jokes. And, as there are a lot of game references, a really clever and befitting idea is the use of “tilt-shift” lens which gives the aerial shots the miniaturized look of the board game “Game of Life”.

You loved “The Switch” (2010), “Horrible Bosses” (2011), “Bad Words” (2013), and the like? You’ll love “Game Night” too.

BlacKkKlansman (2018): Biography / Comedy / Crime

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Sarcastic, serious, light, but also profound, “BlacKkKlansman” hits the nail. Incredible performances, stupendous directing, and meticulous writing mix perfectly for more than two hours in a film stamped with Spike Lee’s persona and talent.

John David Washington, Adam Driver, and Michael Buscemi, infiltrate and take down from the inside Topher Grace’s “KKK” in a humorous and not depressing way and add some entertaining fiction to these, based on a true story, events. Laura Harrier, Ryan Eggold, and Jasper Pääkkönen are equally exceptional.

There has been some negative reviews regarding the different approach the film has comparing to the book but people need to realize that the moving pictures is an entirely different medium which addresses a much larger and diverse audience. Consequently, if the film doesn’t focus on the undercover work against the black activists, or presents the “KKK” as caricatures, us, the viewers, we either accept or not the adaptation’s angle on the subject matter.

Before you start casting stones though, just in case you haven’t watched it yet, or simply missed it, “BlacKkKlansman” makes you smile and laugh for the first two hours and brings tears to your eyes only for the last two minutes because it is about love and hope rather than hate and despair.